TOP 
UPCOMING MEETINGS the best way to get connected is to visit
  • Last Sunday's Message:
    May 20, 2018
    John - That You May Believe Scripture:
    John 16:16-33
    -
    Speaker: Jon Kopp - Due to technical difficulties, only part of this sermon was recorded. "Let us be courageous and rejoice always, believing that we are safe. Let us consider that the Lord is with us, who broke evil...
TOP 

Sermon Audio

Filter media by:
Beatus - Favored by God
Sun, Nov 03, 2013
Hits: 2175
52 mins
Speaker: Lukus Counterman - So how does Matthew 5:6, “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness,” fit into the flow of the Sermon on the Mount? Well, this longing for righteousness is the spiritual consequence of the first three beatitudes. If we know our sin and spiritual poverty, if we mourn over it and live meekly because of it, we will hunger and thirst for righteousness. That is, we will seek it, yearn for it, and ask God to help us attain it. The pursuit of righteousness however is not a popular endeavor in our culture. Some view it as a prudish, narrow-minded, or even an arrogant form of legalism. They are content to seek other things – spiritual maturity, real happiness, positive outlooks, effective skills, or some spiritual experience. But how many hunger and thirst for righteousness? It’s not to say that those other things are not desirable, but they are not as basic as righteousness. What is needed in our day is a pursuit that views righteousness as important as food or drink. Christians should have parched souls and famished hearts that long for righteousness such that they cannot get along without it. As Martin Luther once said, what is needed is “a hunger and thirst for righteousness that can never be curbed or stopped or sated.” All of mankind has a spiritual hunger, a longing and a restlessness that can only be quenched by God through the Lord Jesus. Augustine spoke of this craving when he said “Thou hast made us for thyself, and our hearts are restless until they find their rest in thee.” May the Lord fill those who hunger today.
Roots To Fruits
Sun, Nov 03, 2013
Hits: 2444
23 mins 22 secs
Life Under The Sun
Sun, Oct 27, 2013
Hits: 2840
47 mins 17 secs
Speaker: Jon Kopp - The book of Ecclesiastes tells us that in an effort to to find the secret to satisfaction, Solomon conducts the largest experiment of human experience imaginable. “Is there any gain to be found from life under the sun?” he asks. And this is a question we’d all love the answer too, isn’t it? Because, when we aren’t happy, what do we blame? Isn’t it always something we don’t have? I’d be happier if this person respected me more. I’d be happier if my husband or wife was more romantic. I’d be happier if I had a better car. More money. A better position at work. More time to myself. So, Solomon says, you know what. I’ll try it. I’ll try all those things. Yes. All. He is quite qualified to conduct such an experiment. He is “king over Israel in Jerusalem.” He has “seen everything that is done under the sun,” and he has “great wisdom, surpassing all who were over Jerusalem before [him].” Solomon is qualified to look for the secret to satisfaction, and He’s going to shoot straight with you in a way that others can’t or won’t. Life under the sun is empty. But, is there satisfaction to be found? May God show us how we can make sense of the days of our short life under the sun.
Roots To Fruits
Sun, Oct 27, 2013
Hits: 1893
25 mins 35 secs
Speaker: Jon Kopp - Serving involves work done for the Lord primarily through the local church. It is one of the “branches” from which God brings forth spiritual fruit. Fruitful disciples dedicate them- selves and their resource to the work of their Lord, Jesus Christ. They find ways to be involved in the ministries of the church and understand the concept that every member (of the church) is a minister.
Beatus - Favored by God
Sun, Oct 20, 2013
Hits: 2844
1 hr 3 mins
Speaker: Lukus Counterman - When poverty of spirit and mourning over sin settle deep in a person’s heart, what is the effect? Jesus introduces the third beatitude indicating that the immediate effect is to make us meek. Now the word “meekness” is difficult to define. It’s not a super-passivity or a lack of backbone. Instead it is the humble strength that belongs to the one who has learned to submit to the Lord in times of difficulty and in turn express gentleness with sinners. The person who is meek has come to understand that in everything God is working for his good. Sinclair Ferguson wrote, “There is probably no more beautiful quality in a Christian than meekness. It enhances manliness; it adorns femininity. It is a jewel polished by grace. But it is all too rare.” Our prayer this morning is that God would work this Kingdom characteristic in each of us. “Matthew 5:5 says “Blessed are the meek…” Does that describe you?
Roots To Fruits
Sun, Oct 20, 2013
Hits: 1906
25 mins 51 secs
Beatus - Favored by God
Sun, Oct 13, 2013
Hits: 2053
42 mins 13 secs
Speaker: Lukus Counterman - We will be studying the second characteristic of Kingdom citizens described by our Lord in the Sermon on the Mount. The unusual thing about this beatitude in Matthew 5:4 is that Christ links the comfort of God to mourning. He seems to say that the way to a jubilant heart is through tears. But these aren’t just any tears; they are the tears of one who is broken and contrite. These tears result from “godly grief” like that of the sensitive 18th Century missionary named David Brainerd. On October 18, 1740, he wrote in his journal, “In my morning devotions my soul was exceedingly melted, and bitterly mourned over my exceeding sinfulness and vileness.” Perhaps the tears he shed are the kind which God is said to store in his bottle (Ps. 56:8). Such mourning, such bewailing over sin is promised divine comfort. God in his grace freely forgives those who come to him and grieve over their sin. Jesus himself was the promised comforter. He would comfort his people (Isaiah 40:1), bring consolation (Luke 2:25), and give a beautiful headdress instead of ashes, the oil of gladness instead of mourning, and the garment of praise instead of a faint spirit (Isaiah 61:3). Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted.
Roots To Fruits
Sun, Oct 13, 2013
Hits: 1909
24 mins 25 secs
Beatus - Favored by God
Sun, Oct 06, 2013
Hits: 2900
45 mins 55 secs
Speaker: Lukus Counterman - This morning we will be looking at the opening three verses of a text known as the “Sermon on the Mount.” Many believe that no other religious speech in the history of humanity has attracted as much attention as this sermon that Jesus preached two millennia ago. Philosophers, presidents, activists, and religious gurus have admired its ethos. St. Augustine described the Sermon on the Mount as “a perfect standard of the Christian life.” In contrast, one of the most famous non-Christian devotees to Jesus’ sermon was a man of the 19th century named Mohandas Gandhi. More recently, in a Democratic debate held in New Hampshire in 2007 candidates were asked, “What is your favorite Bible verse?” To which, 3 out of 8 alluded to the Sermon on the Mount. Who were those three politicians – Hillary Rodham Clinton, Barak Obama, and Bill Richardson. How can a single sermon have such broad popularity? I think Warren Kissinger summed it up, “The sermon is like a mighty tall mountain that from a distance has attracted people from all traditions and faiths.” Perhaps it has attracted people from a distance, but as we get closer can its teachings be so broadly applied and so easily embraced? This morning we will find that Jesus’ sermon was not intended for Ghandi’s struggle to free India from British imperialistic oppression. Nor was it a “good rule for politics” as Hillary Clinton suggested. Instead, the sermon begins with a description of the character of Kingdom citizens. It opens with a profile of true followers of Christ. The opening verses are called the Beatitudes.
Roots To Fruits
Sun, Oct 06, 2013
Hits: 1934
26 mins 34 secs
Speaker: Jon Kopp - Faithful attendance at a good, Bible-preaching, local church will provide you with opportunities to “put down roots.” This involves forming loving and caring relationships with other believers. These relationships will help strengthen you in your growth process as well as keep you firmly planted when the storms of life come and the winds of discouragement blow.